March 2020

White Stargazer Lily - Planting and Growing

Thursday, March 19, 2020 0
White Stargazer Lily - Planting and Growing
The White Stargazer Lily, as with all lilies, is a hybrid of the Oriental Lily. Like other lily varieties, the flowers of the White Stargazer Lily has attractive flowers. Its flowers are perfect for adding to any flower garden. Or even along the edge of a fence, or along the side or front of your house. As its name suggests, the flower is a pure white color. They can go along with other varieties of Stargazer Lilies or any other type of lilies. Not only lilies but also tulips and even irises. With your white Stargazer lilies, One stem can develop anywhere from two to eight flowers. Each plant is sure to offer plenty of blooms wherever you plant them.

Audrey from Central Pennsylvania, USA / CC BY

How to Plant White Stargazer Lilies

Stargazer lilies are easy to plant and grow. The blooms can withstand temporary cooler temperatures but the plants themselves do well in cold climates. They can also grow in poorer soils. But well-drained soil helps provide for the healthiest plants with the best blooms.

Once the plants become established they will provide many blooms, every season, for many, many years to come.

Since they can get up to three feet in height be sure to choose an optimal place for where you look to plant them. Much like other flowers that grow from bulbs, you can plant the bulbs of the Stargazer Lily in fall or early spring. Place the bulbs should a few inches apart, around six to eight inches apart, and at a depth of four to six inches. I usually plant the bulbs in groups of four and in a symmetrical manner. But the amount of bulbs you want to place together is up to you, with a maximum of five or six per grouping. Also, be sure to plant them somewhere where they can get full sun to partial shade. If needed, you can cover the base of the flowers with mulch to preserve soil moisture. In wetter soil, it's best not to use mulching since it can oversaturate the plant and cause the bulbs to rot.


When Will Your White Stargazer Lilies Bloom?

Your white Stargazer lilies will flower from mid to late-summer in most regions. Since they are perennial flowers, you can expect them to bloom around the same time every year. At the end of the blooming season, you can remove the old blossoms. Be sure to not remove any of the leaves from the plant though. As the plant dies back for the season, after the leaves discolor and turn brown, you can remove the leaves and stems. Which can also aid in having a good or better bloom the following summer.

Fertilizing and Watering White Stargazer Lilies

Fertilizing isn't always required if the soil that your lilies are planted in is healthy. If you do feel that your lilies need fertilizer, then a 10-10-10 fertilizer should do. You should add a good amount of fertilizer in the springtime. Be sure to add not long after the lilies have begun to sprout from the ground. Then water your lilies if needed.

When in bloom your white Stargazer lilies will need watering every week or whenever the soil looks dry. You can either keep a hose near your lilies for the convenience of watering them as needed. But don't over water them or water them in a way that damages your flowers. Essentially, you want the water to soak down six inches into the soil. You could also place a drip irrigation system to water your flowers. In really dry regions you can use mulching to help the soil retain water.

Transplanting a White Stargazer Lily

 In a few years, you may find that your lilies have outgrown the area where you've planted them. You can take advantage of this and help spread your lilies out elsewhere in your yard or flower garden. You can dig up some of the bulbs, divide them, and plant them any time when the lilies are not flowering. But it's best to do it in the spring or in the fall to give the bulbs time to establish good roots. Transplanting them in the fall is the best time of year to do it.





The Crying Woman of Persimmon Valley - Eastern Kentucky

Wednesday, March 04, 2020 0
The Crying Woman of Persimmon Valley - Eastern Kentucky
Deep in the heart of Eastern Kentucky lies a small, secluded valley. A quiet place tucked in the hills miles from any highway. The sides of this valley are lined with Persimmon trees, many planted long ago, that offer a mark of uniqueness to this valley on their own. During the late summer months past, as the pungent fruit began to ripen, people were once drawn from all over to pick the fruit. But, in many recent years, valleys like these have become more forgotten as people prefer not to stray too far from their electronic devices and wireless coverage. But some still do visit to find temporary refuge from all the noise of modern society. These adventurers make it a custom to visit during autumn to see the leaves of the persimmon trees turn bright yellow and red, making a beautiful mountain picture.

Some believe that not all is beautiful in Persimmon Valley though or, at least, not always cheery and serene. During the hours of some autumn evenings, during the twilight and unto darkness, one may just hear the spectral cries of a young woman coming from an indiscernible direction. In the past, many people have looked for her, thinking a young woman may have been in some trouble. They'd search, unable to pinpoint where her sparse cries were coming from and thus they were unable to find where she was. Many people have experienced that indiscernible cry, where the crying did seem to come from where ever they were not standing. One experience by a young man went as such, "I’d hear the sobbing of a young woman and it seemed to be coming from the upper end of the valley, but when I got to the upper end, it sounded as if it was coming from the lower end. I chased that sound all over that valley one night."


No one has ever seen the crying woman but many have heard her weeping. Sometimes the weeping can go on for hours here and there and other times only for a short interval. On some occasions, you can hear the weeping fade out as if it is slipping away into the ether. Many families have sought to purchase the property but when they find out about the dispirited sounds that emanate from the branches of the Persimmons and elsewhere within the haunted hollow, they change their minds.

One local legend tells the tale of a young couple that had moved into the region from northern Maine. They had just gotten married and were looking for a place to begin their life. When they rode by the valley, they both immediately fell in love with the hollow. That evening they camped under the branches of the largest Persimmon tree. Unknown to them, while they dreamt of their future home, they were spotted by a few Cherokee who had crept upon them. Before they could begin to fight, one of the Cherokee engaged with the young man then cut him down with stabs and slashes of their knife. Then they proceeded to scalp him. He fell to the ground, blood gushing from his head and multiple wounds. It is then said that they tied the young woman to the tree and left her there in those woods. She was helpless as she watched the last ounces of life drain from her husband. The Cherokee, who reacted out of frustration of encroachment on their lands, never came back to take her into captivity. Since this region of Kentucky, amongst the hills of the Appalachians, was sparsely populated the woman would have died from starvation before anyone found her.

It is told that the spirit of this young bride made its imprint and still roams the valley, crying for her husband as he had laid dying. Her tragedy marking itself upon the environment with every weight of her spiritual energy as she faded from starvation.

Today, a more established highway passes by the valley that lies amongst the forested roadsides. A highway on the path of what once was a dirt wagon trail. Its passengers, completely unaware of the history and everything else that they're passing through. Those persimmon trees still produce their fruits in the early fall. They become less noticed each year. Their leaves provide a beautiful sight for any motorists who stop to hike. And, in the still of the night, when all the cars have stopped making their way past the valley, one can hear the faint sobbing of that young woman, crying for her lost love.

Read a similar tale:
Legend of Murder Creek in Akron, New York - The Tragedy of Ah-weh-hah

Katelyn Nicole Davis ♥ Forever Missed