White Stargazer Lily - Planting and Growing

White Stargazer Lily - Planting and Growing

The White Stargazer Lily, as with all lilies, is a hybrid of the Oriental Lily. Like other lily varieties, the flowers of the White Stargazer Lily has attractive flowers. Its flowers are perfect for adding to any flower garden. Or even along the edge of a fence, or along the side or front of your house. As its name suggests, the flower is a pure white color. They can go along with other varieties of Stargazer Lilies or any other type of lilies. Not only lilies but also tulips and even irises. With your white Stargazer lilies, One stem can develop anywhere from two to eight flowers. Each plant is sure to offer plenty of blooms wherever you plant them.

Audrey from Central Pennsylvania, USA / CC BY

How to Plant White Stargazer Lilies

Stargazer lilies are easy to plant and grow. The blooms can withstand temporary cooler temperatures but the plants themselves do well in cold climates. They can also grow in poorer soils. But well-drained soil helps provide for the healthiest plants with the best blooms.

Once the plants become established they will provide many blooms, every season, for many, many years to come.

Since they can get up to three feet in height be sure to choose an optimal place for where you look to plant them. Much like other flowers that grow from bulbs, you can plant the bulbs of the Stargazer Lily in fall or early spring. Place the bulbs should a few inches apart, around six to eight inches apart, and at a depth of four to six inches. I usually plant the bulbs in groups of four and in a symmetrical manner. But the amount of bulbs you want to place together is up to you, with a maximum of five or six per grouping. Also, be sure to plant them somewhere where they can get full sun to partial shade. If needed, you can cover the base of the flowers with mulch to preserve soil moisture. In wetter soil, it's best not to use mulching since it can oversaturate the plant and cause the bulbs to rot.


When Will Your White Stargazer Lilies Bloom?

Your white Stargazer lilies will flower from mid to late-summer in most regions. Since they are perennial flowers, you can expect them to bloom around the same time every year. At the end of the blooming season, you can remove the old blossoms. Be sure to not remove any of the leaves from the plant though. As the plant dies back for the season, after the leaves discolor and turn brown, you can remove the leaves and stems. Which can also aid in having a good or better bloom the following summer.

Fertilizing and Watering White Stargazer Lilies

Fertilizing isn't always required if the soil that your lilies are planted in is healthy. If you do feel that your lilies need fertilizer, then a 10-10-10 fertilizer should do. You should add a good amount of fertilizer in the springtime. Be sure to add not long after the lilies have begun to sprout from the ground. Then water your lilies if needed.

When in bloom your white Stargazer lilies will need watering every week or whenever the soil looks dry. You can either keep a hose near your lilies for the convenience of watering them as needed. But don't over water them or water them in a way that damages your flowers. Essentially, you want the water to soak down six inches into the soil. You could also place a drip irrigation system to water your flowers. In really dry regions you can use mulching to help the soil retain water.

Transplanting a White Stargazer Lily

 In a few years, you may find that your lilies have outgrown the area where you've planted them. You can take advantage of this and help spread your lilies out elsewhere in your yard or flower garden. You can dig up some of the bulbs, divide them, and plant them any time when the lilies are not flowering. But it's best to do it in the spring or in the fall to give the bulbs time to establish good roots. Transplanting them in the fall is the best time of year to do it.





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