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Akwesasne Notes Archive - Kahniakehaka Nation

Friday, August 17, 2018 0
Akwesasne Notes Archive - Kahniakehaka Nation
Some of the Akwesasne Notes are available for reading at the link below. They are a series of (albeit incomplete) archived articles that served, and still serves, as a voice of Indigenous Peoples.

As one source puts it:

Akwesasne Notes is a Journal for Native and Natural Peoples and has been known for the last 26 years as "the Voice of Indigenous Peoples."Akwesasne Notes is a news journal dedicated to reporting on the issues and concerns of Native Peoples. It is also dedicated to the presentation, preservation, perpetuation, and portrayal of Native cultures of the Americas and throughout the world.

"Akwesasne Notes" Subscription Information

Kahniakehaka Nation Akwesasne Mohawk Territory P.O.Box 366 via Roseveltown, NY 13683-0196 Phone (518) 358-3326 FAX (518) 358-3488 Subscription Information
Flag of the Mohawk Nation of Akwesasne
 Flag of the Mohawk Nation of Akwesasne
By Xasartha [CC BY-SA 3.0 ], from Wikimedia Commons


Life and Struggles in Louisiana in the 1930s

Saturday, August 04, 2018 0
Life and Struggles in Louisiana in the 1930s
Life in Louisiana, much like the rest of the United States, moved at a lot slower pace in the 30s than it does today. Yet, there were no shortages of troubles. The song by Alabama folk singer Vera Hall comes to mind.

The Great Depression was one of the largest troubles throughout most of the 1930s and affected economies worldwide. With Louisiana being a major agricultural state in the South, these economic problems led to the downfall of many farms. Especially those owned by poor whites and poor blacks alike. Prices of goods fell to all-time lows and many farmers couldn't afford to keep their farms. In turn, workers weren't able to get paid or had to settle for even lower wages at plantations or at other jobs. It was bad enough that many families in rural Louisiana already lived in poverty. The Great Depression made it far worse. As had the drought of 1930-1931 where many families had to apply to get aid from the American Red Cross. More on this can be read at http://www.knowlouisiana.org/entry/great-depression-in-louisiana

A poem by Langston Hughes, Let America Be America Again, was written during the time of the Great Depression. In it is a section that is an expression of how many citizens felt at the time. Especially in the Southern States where many working-class citizens were affected. Most of us have not learned about the details of this shared history but it was immigrants, more recent descendants of immigrants, descendants of slaves, Native Americans, and owners of small farms who were mainly affected. This while larger farms (wealthy plantations) in the South thrived due to the cheaper labor and other factors. They proudly took advantage of the economic troubles to the detriment of nearly everyone else. See: Were there successful farming plantations during the Great Depression?

"I am the poor white, fooled and pushed apart,
I am the Negro bearing slavery’s scars.
I am the red man driven from the land,
I am the immigrant clutching the hope I seek--
And finding only the same old stupid plan
Of dog eat dog, of mighty crush the weak."

Those who were just scraping by before the Great Depression, many of them felt the brunt of the blow of economic troubles. Yet they persevered. Many of these photos display the strong character of those days and of the past. Which was not only a trait of Louisiana but also of Americans from other states and walks of life during the Great Depression.

UnemployedTrapperPlaqueminesShahn
Florestine Carson, unemployed Creole Negro trapper, and daughter, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana.
By Ben Shahn (FSA photo by Ben Shahn via [1]) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Citizenship Class in the Hungarian Settlement in Livingston Parish Louisiana
Citizenship Class in the Hungarian Settlement in Livingston Parish Louisiana - Albany, Louisiana
By Uncredited photographer for the WPA (Works Progress Administration photo via [1]) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

KennerNegroNightSchoolWPA
1936; Works Progress Administration night school for African Americans in the town of Kenner, Jefferson Parish
By Uncredited WPA photographer (Works Progress Administration photo, via [1]) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

DestrehanNegroSchoolRussellLee1938
"Negro school, Destrehan, Louisiana", September 1938
Russell Lee [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Zydeco players Louisiana 1938
Musicians playing accordion and washboard in front of a store, near New Iberia, Louisiana. November 1938
Russell Lee [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

StClaudeMandevillePavingStreetcarWPA
WPA work repaving and widening on St. Claude Avenue, view at the corner of Mandeville Street, with St. Claude
By Uncredited Works Progress Administration photographer (WPA photo via [1]) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

New Roads Louisiana 1938 Negro Section by Russell Lee
New Roads Louisiana in 1938. Looking across the railroad tracks into the African American section of New Roads, Louisiana. Store sign reads: Felix Fazenda Fine Wines and Liquors. Morning Treat. Signs also for Jax beer, RC Cola, and the Cresent Saloon.
Russell Lee [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Cleomabreaux
An image of musician Cléoma Breaux with her husband Joe Falcon
See page for author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

StJosephNightGuitaristsNOLA1930s
African American musicians playing guitars on St. Joseph's Day Night,St. Joseph's Day is the traditional post-Mardi Gras last gathering of the season for the "Mardi Gras Indians" organizations.
By Unnamed WPA photographer (WPA photo via [1]) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

GirlWithUmbrella1937Lange
Young woman with umbrella, Louisiana, July 1937
Dorothea Lange [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons


FERA New Orleans 1935 Looking
Men standing on the sidewalk outside Federal Emergency Relief Administration office. October 1935
Location seems to be S. Claiborne Avenue between Washington Avenue and 4th Street, on the lakewards side of the street.
By Ben Shahn [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Spiritual Meeting at Father Treadwells Church NOLA
Spiritual meeting at Father Treadwell's Church in New Orleans Louisiana in the 1930s. Church of God in Christ. Rev. Lucien H. Treadwell, Pastor.
By Unnamed WPA photographer (Works Progress Administration photograph via [1]) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

CreoleGirlsPlaquemines1935
Three Creole Girls, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, October 1935
By Ben Shahn [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

JeaneretteConversation1938Lee
Men talking on a porch of a small store near Jeanerette, Louisiana. October 1938. Iberia Parish, Louisiana
Russell Lee [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Raceland Louisiana Beer Drinkers Russell Lee
Drinking at beer the bar, Raceland, Louisiana. September 1938
Russell Lee [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Two Boys Leaning on Fence Donaldsonville LA 1938
Two boys leaning on fence watching parade, state fair, Donaldsonville, Louisiana, November 1938
Russell Lee [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

TransylvaniaStoreCounter1939
Men in cooperative general store. Transylvania, Louisiana, January 1939
Russell Lee [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

TransylvaniaTheRainAreFallin
Mother teaching children numbers and alphabet in the home of a sharecropper. Transylvania, Louisiana. January 1939
Russell Lee [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Mardi Gras Clowns in New Orleans Louisiana in 1936
New Orleans Mardi Gras, 1936. 3 street costumers dressed as clowns.
By Unnamed WPA photographer (WPA photo via [1]) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Conquian Players Louisiana 1938
2 African American men sitting playing Conquian (card game), September 1938.
Russell Lee [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

RacelandBarDancingRussellLee
Dancing at bar in Raceland, Louisiana, September 1938.
Russell Lee [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

CrowleySteelGuitar1938
Steel guitarist at microphone, Cajun band contest, National Rice Festival, Crowley Louisiana, October 1938
Russell Lee [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

OrleansParishPrisonLiteracyClass1937
Literacy class at the Parish Prison, New Orleans. February 16, 1937
By Uncredited WPA photographer (WPA photo via [1] # 17.33) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

WPA-Radio-Class-1937
Photograph of WPA Education — Radio Class, Magnolia School, 2246 Carondelet Street, New Orleans. January 18, 1937
By Works Progress Administration [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

WPANOLATrumpets
Trumpet players with WPA band, New Orleans, November 30, 1937
By Uncredited photographer for the Works Progress Administration, a U.S. Federal Government agency. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

RiceIsKingCrowley1938
Children on parade float with the inscription "Rice Is King", National Rice Festival, Crowley, Louisiana., October 1938.
By Russell Lee [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

CrowleyCajunFiddler1938
Musicians in Cajun band contest, National Rice Festival, Crowley, Louisiana. October 1938
By Russell Lee [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

CrowleyStreetDance1938RussellLee
Street dancing, National Rice Festival, Crowley Louisiana, October 1938
Russell Lee [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

A store with live fish for sale, vicinity of Natchitoches, La. LCCN2017877474
A store with live fish for sale, vicinity of Natchitoches, Louisiana. 1939
By Wolcott, Marion Post, 1910-1990, photographer [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

A cross roads store, bar, "juke joint," and gas station in the cotton plantation area, Melrose, La. LCCN2017877468
Title: A cross roads store, bar, "juke joint," and gas station in the cotton plantation area, Melrose, Louisiana. 1939
By Wolcott, Marion Post, 1910-1990, photographer [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons


Tree Sitters Block Bayou Bridge Pipeline Construction in Atchafalaya Basin

Monday, July 23, 2018 0
Tree Sitters Block Bayou Bridge Pipeline Construction in Atchafalaya Basin
ATCHAFALAYA NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA, LA: Water protectors living high in the canopy of old growth cypress trees brought construction on the Bayou Bridge pipeline to a halt earlier today in the Atchafalaya Basin, the largest swamp in North America.

The action – known as a tree sit– was initiated to amplify pleas from Louisiana residents who have begged their local elected officials to protect these ancient trees from destruction by the pipeline company and to provide an evacuation route for the predominantly African American St. James community, which sits at the tail end of the 163-mile Energy Transfer Partners project.

The Bayou Bridge Pipeline

The Bayou Bridge Pipeline (BBP) would impact numerous communities across Southern Louisiana. The pipeline would lead to more fracking for oil in the shale fields of North Dakota and further the global dependence on climate change-causing fossil fuels.

http://nobbp.org/breaking-tree-sitters-block-bayou-bridge-pipeline-construction-in-atchafalaya-basin/

Satellites Investigate Irrigation in a Stressed Aquifer | NASA Earth Observatory

Monday, July 16, 2018 0
Satellites Investigate Irrigation in a Stressed Aquifer | NASA Earth Observatory
"The High Plains Aquifer, also known as the Ogallala Aquifer, is under stress. Farmers today have to drill ever deeper wells in order to pump water for irrigation, and one recent study found the aquifer to be under more strain than any other in the United States."


Facts about the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer:

The industrial-level pumping of water from the aquifer began after World War II.

By 1980, the aquifer's water levels had dropped by at least ten feet in most of the regions that took advantage of it.

Some regions of the High Plains, at that same time, had seen a 100-foot drop in their water level.

These days, the water being pulled out of the aquifer annually is equal to eighteen Colorado Rivers.

The northern end of the Ogallala Aquifer is less affected by the overuse. The southern end is the part of the aquifer that is less likely to recover, as it doesn't receive as much precipitation annually.

Shown below is a map of the Ogallala Aquifer, how long it has been irrigated in different regions, and a link to the full article.

Satellites Investigate Irrigation in a Stressed Aquifer

Using Landsat to track patterns in irrigation may help water managers sketch out a more sustainable future for the Ogallala Aquifer in the central United States.


NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is aiming for the sun | Science News

Saturday, July 07, 2018 0
NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is aiming for the sun | Science News
"NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is about to embark on one daredevil stunt of a space mission.
Slated to launch August 4, the probe will be the first spacecraft to swoop through the sun’s outer atmosphere, or corona, a roiling inferno of plasma heated to several million degrees Celsius.

The solar probe, if all goes well, is set to circle the sun two dozen times during its seven-year mission. It will be orbiting the sun from approximately six million kilometers away and at a speed of around 700,000 kilometers per hour. The Parker Solar Probe will observe the corona and the solar wind created by the sun. Both of which will likely help in learning more about the sun and its atmosphere. The information gathered from this mission will help future space travel.

Along with the probe will be the names of those who filled out a "Send Your Name To The Sun" submission at http://parkersolarprobe.jhuapl.edu/The-Mission/Name-to-Sun/ before the deadline back in April.


NASA's Parker probe is about to get up close and personal with the sun

NASA's Parker Solar Probe is about to embark on one daredevil stunt of a space mission. Slated to launch August 4, the probe will be the first spacecraft to swoop through the sun's outer atmosphere, or corona, a roiling inferno of plasma heated to several million degrees Celsius.