March 2018

Zuckerberg: Maybe tech should face some regulations | TheHill

Thursday, March 22, 2018
Zuckerberg: Maybe tech should face some regulations | TheHill
Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg said on Wednesday that he’s open to having his company be regulated.
Sure, social media and tech companies should face regulations involving political ads and advertising 'content' created by Political Action Committees. The truth to why this is being pushed now has less to do with regulation to create increasing transparency.

No, it is more about political motivations and, to put it more clearly, dis-empowerment of certain social, political views and demographics in this country. Not from Zuckerberg himself, but from those putting pressure on Facebook and other 'social media' websites to increase politicians' power over free (in terms of free speech) mediums. Deeper down, it is as much about political influence in terms of ads as it is about curbing political expression by notable figures on social media. We've all seen it on YouTube, for example, in how YouTubers on both the left and right have lost advertising revenue and some even videos or even their accounts.

This isn't Washington trying to have their policies catch up to the digital world. No, this is about them slowing down the progression of freedom on the internet. It's mostly about decreasing the influence that ordinary people have and giving preference to (for the lack of a better term) Authorized™ Entertainment Media Personalities. You cannot control the thoughts of ideas of those beholden to no one as opposed to those whose multi-million careers and money flow could dry up overnight if they express the wrong social view.
 

Just something to think about.

Zuckerberg: Maybe tech should face some regulations | TheHill

Mars rover update: March 21, 2018 | Behind The Black

Thursday, March 22, 2018
Mars rover update: March 21, 2018 | Behind The Black
English: NASA's next Mars rover, Curiosity, dr...
English: NASA's next Mars rover, Curiosity, drives up a ramp during a test at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Polski: Łazik "Curiosity", agencji kosmicznej NASA, wjeżdża na rampę podczas testów zawieszenia w JPL. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Curiosity continues its exploration of Vera Rubin Ridge, including several drilling attempts. Opportunity is halfway down Perseverance Valley.
The Vera Rubin Ridge on Mars is named after Vera Florence Cooper Rubin whose observations of galaxies and stars ultimately provided evidence of the existence of dark matter. She was an astronomer in a career that spanned over multiple titles and multiple colleges, universities, and institutes from 1955 right up until her passing on December 25, 2015.

Read the detailed post at Mars rover update: March 21, 2018 | Behind The Black

Parts of San Francisco are sinking faster than the sea is rising | New Scientist

Saturday, March 10, 2018
Parts of San Francisco are sinking faster than the sea is rising | New Scientist

Rising seas aren’t the only problem facing low-lying coastal areas. Many of these areas are also sinking, vastly increasing the risk of flooding. 
English: The marshes next to Foster City, Cali...
English: The marshes next to Foster City, California, with its name carved into them for the viewing pleasure of those on flights landing at San Francisco International Airport (SFO). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

According the the article at New Scientist, specific areas of the San Francisco Bay Area are sinking at a rate of up 10mm per year.

Areas which include the San Francisco International Airport, the artificial island Treasure Island, and Foster City. Foster City was built upon a marsh and former landfill off San Francisco Bay. So it shouldn't be that much of a surprise why Foster City is sinking. Similarly, much of the San Francisco International Airport was also built on wetlands. Treasure Island shares similarities to Foster City since it was also created from a former landfill. These areas in and around San Francisco are sinking quicker than sea levels are rising.

Read More: Parts of San Francisco are sinking faster than the sea is rising | New Scientist